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Monday 22nd June

                          Maths

Multiplication Challenge

Multiplication Challenge 1
Every day this week, draw the grid in your book.  Time how long it takes you to complete it and record your time.  By the end of the week, how quickly can you complete the grid?  If there are any multiplication facts you struggled with, focus on them to ensure you build up instant recall.  Good luck - let me know your best time!

Odd-One-Out - Can you find at least 11 reasons why? Send in your thinking.

Odd-One-Out - Can you find at least 11 reasons why?  Send in your thinking. 1

Number Investigation

Number Investigation  1

HINT

It may help to write the digits on pieces of paper so you can move them around.

 

Consecutive numbers are numbers that follow each other in order, without a gap.  For example:

1,2,3,4  

                         English

In English this week we are going to continue our work on the story called One Chance.

 

Re-read the opening, thinking about the words chosen by the writer. What words has the writer used to try to show what Jack and Sarah are like? I have highlighted words that show what Jack is like here:

 

Extract from One Chance 1. 

 

Outside, the evening was cold and wet. A squally wind howled, rattling the roof tiles and shaking the window frames of 13 Wager Road. Inside, shabby curtains were drawn, a humble fire crackled and a couple sat in silence. Jack stretched out on the tired couch with an amused smile, turning the page of his favourite novel.

 

This is what these words make me think about Jack:

“The word ‘stretched’ makes me think Jack is lying down and very relaxed. He is reading one of his favourite novels or books which I think he has read many times. In addition, he appears to be happy and content because he has an ‘amused smile’.” 

 

Task 1: Now it is your turn. Read the paragraph below. Can write down some words to show us what Sarah is like?  

Sarah scowled, silently seething. She scanned the room, noticing the worn-out furniture, peeling paint and, in her opinion, a pointless, idle husband. She deserved so much more than this.   

 

Task 2: 

Outside, the evening was cold and wet. A squally wind howled, rattling the roof tiles and shaking the window frames of 13 Wager Road. Inside, shabby curtains were drawn, a humble fire crackled and a couple sat in silence. Jack stretched out on the tired couch with an amused smile, slowly turning the page of his favourite novel. Sarah scowled, silently seething. She scanned the room, noticing the worn-out furniture, peeling paint and, in her opinion, a pointless, idle husband. She deserved so much more than this. Is there a difference between the outside and the inside?

Is there a difference between the outside and the inside?  

Outside,___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Inside, _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

                         Science
Picture 1
Picture 2
Picture 3

Experiment 1

1. Choose a place where you will always stand during this activity. Make sure it is in the middle of an open concrete space, with no shadows nearby – this could be just outside your home on the pavement, if you don’t have a garden space. Mark this space by using your chalk to outline your shoes.

      2.  Stand in your chosen spot and have your helper use chalk to trace the outline of your shadow on the concrete.

      3.  Use your chalk to write the time at the top of your shadow.

     4.  Repeat these steps every hours, each time marking the time of day at the top of your shadow.

 

What do you notice about your shadow?

When was your shadow longest?

Why does your shadow move?

 

Experiment 2 – Making a shadow clock

       1.  Cut out a circle from some stiff card to make a dial (an old cereal box is ideal).

      2.  Push a pencil through the middle of the circle.

      3.  Push the pencil into the ground (in a place where it will get a lot of sun).

     4.  Mark on the dial where the pencil’s shadow falls each hour.

 

Is the distance between the markings the same?

Try the experiment the next day.  Do you still get identical markings? 

Can you use this to explain how the Earth moves?

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